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Why Many Baby Boomers Often Don’t Address Chronic Pain

Medical Challenges Unspoken: Understanding Baby Boomers’ Reluctance to Address Chronic Pain

Written by: Aaron Michael Buch

Baby Boomers Chronic Pain

The baby boomer generation, born between 1946 and 1964, grew up in a time when mental health issues such as anxiety, fear, depression, and all other types of mental health were not widely discussed or understood. These topics were often considered taboo and were not considered an acceptable topic of conversation. This has led to a lack of understanding and acceptance of mental health issues within the baby boomer generation, and many people in this age group may be hesitant to seek help or talk about their mental health concerns. All of this is true as it pertains to surgical anxiety, discussion and taking the first steps to get their chronic pain addressed.

One of the reasons that mental health issues were considered taboo among the baby boomer generation is that mental illness was not widely recognized as a legitimate medical condition. It was often viewed as a personal weakness or a sign of moral failing. This attitude was not limited to the general public, but also existed among many medical professionals and institutions.

Another reason mental health issues were considered taboo in the baby boomer generation was the belief that these issues should be kept private and not discussed with others. This mindset may have stemmed from the traditional and conservative values that many baby boomers were raised with, which emphasized the importance of self-reliance, stoicism, and maintaining a strong image.

Additionally, society and culture during that time, did not have the same level of understanding and acceptance of mental health issues as it does today, there were also limited resources available for people struggling with mental health issues, making it even more difficult to seek help.

Furthermore, many baby boomers may have felt ashamed to talk about their mental health issues because of the negative stereotypes and stigmatizing attitudes associated with mental illness. They may have feared being judged, dismissed or even discriminated against if they were to reveal their struggles with mental health.

The baby boomer generation grew up in a time when mental health issues were considered taboo and were not widely discussed or understood. This has led to a lack of understanding and acceptance of mental health issues within this age group, and many people may be hesitant to seek help or talk about their mental health concerns. Today, things have changed and society has a better understanding of mental health, but it is important for medical professionals, family, and friends to continue to break down the taboo and create an environment where older generations feel comfortable to talk about their mental health concerns and seek help when needed.

Suggested Read: How Healthcare Groups Can Help Normalize Surgical Anxiety With Baby Boomers To Grow Their Practice

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